ANNA ROBERTS:

The Bratz doll silhouette has been edging into style for a few years now, but in 2020 it really came into its own. Y2K style is everywhere, especially on Depop and TikTok. Indeed, the sale of vintage and second-hand pieces has also characterised 2020’s trends, partly owing to the movement towards environmentally-conscious fashion consumption.

How will the Y2K obsession translate into 2021’s trends? I’m predicting that flares and platform boots are here to stay. At the moment flares are somewhat fashion-forward, but 2021 might see the flared trouser becoming the staple shape for jeans (and anything that distances our legs from jeggings is good in my book). Personally, I love the resurgence of wedges: faux-suede wedge boots (like the ones your year 5 supply teacher wore) are a trend I fully endorse buying into. Flares and wedges as a noughties throwback coincide well with another 2020 vintage trend: the resurgence of the 70s silhouette. Not just bell-bottoms but also batwing and flute-sleeved tops and printed dresses are coming back. 2021 is shaping up to be a year of fashion throwbacks; I am looking forward to the twenty-twenties-does-noughties-doing-the-nineties-doing-the-seventies trends to come this year. Here’s to higher platforms, home-made corset tops, and low-rise bell-bottoms!

LARISSA KOERBER:

2020 was the year of loungewear and trendy masks. Pandemic attire may have been extremely comfortable, but its time in the spotlight should end.

2021 will likely witness the rise of warm, earthy colours, ranging from camels, terracottas to mustard yellows. The SS21 ready-to-wear collections of landmark fashion houses Gucci, Proenza Schouler, Louis Vuitton, Hermes and Dior showcased pieces in this particular colour palettes. Warm tones are solar, delicate yet bold, and embody a grounded, positive state of mind. They can perfectly be associated with bohemian-style garments and utility wear that will be here to stay in this new year. 2021’s colours bring warmth and security – they will light up our spirits and accompany us for what hopefully will soon be a return to normality. Travelling, exploring – earthy tones are the perfect fit for the adventures that 2021 will bring us. We cannot forget about their versatility: from camel blazers to mahogany, and, pourquoi pas, chartreuse flowy dresses, our entire spring/summer wardrobe will radiate mellow energy. Bonus point: they suit all skin tones and undertones, whether warm or cool!

Cherwell fashion certainly looks forward to witnessing this new trend, albeit remotely for now, but hopefully soon in our personal favourite fashion capital – Oxford.

MARIETTA KOSMA:

Just because we are quarantined, it does not mean that we cannot maintain our sense of style. Even though we are confined, we can still think out of the box. The elegance of the 19th century has inspired fashion over the years, from corsets to hoop skirts. However, an everlasting trend seems to be the Victorian era inspired sleeves. In the 18th century, wearing big puffs of fabric in one’s arms helped define the female figure. As women could not show off their waist or other body parts, bringing emphasis to their arms through the puffed sleeves was essential. However, gone are the days when ruffles and frills were branded ‘too girly’; the trend has been reiterated to give a high-fashion look that’s dramatic and structured all at once’. Victorian sleeves are timeless. They constitute a style statement as they do more than adding a feminine touch to one’s attire, they add a dramatic dimension. Wearing Victorian sleeves makes one look thinner, as they create the illusion of a slimmer waist by drawing attention to one’s arms. They provide a high-fashioned look so I believe that Victorian-inspired sleeves will continue to be a trend in 2021.


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