Oxford's oldest student newspaper

Friday, June 24, 2022

Books

“The world outside our window”: Musings on Marvel

It was recently announced that Penguin Classics would be publishing special editions of certain Marvel comic books. The comics will be part of a ‘Penguin Classics Marvel Collection’, which...

In conversation with Francesca Tacchi

Any book that begins with the sentence “Every day is a good day to...

Netflix’s Newest Sweetheart

Originally posted as a webcomic series on Tumblr in 2019, Alice Oseman’s Heartstopper became...

Maxim Biller and Ukraine: The resignation of a German-Jewish author?

I am well aware that for the sake of switching off from university, or...

Ismat Chughtai on Indian female experiences

The Quilt and Other Stories is a 1994 compilation of short stories by Ismat...

“The world outside our window”: Musings on Marvel

It was recently announced that Penguin Classics would be publishing special editions of certain Marvel comic books. The comics will be part of a...

In conversation with Francesca Tacchi

Any book that begins with the sentence “Every day is a good day to kill Nazis” is bound to catch my interest. Luckily for...

Netflix’s Newest Sweetheart

Originally posted as a webcomic series on Tumblr in 2019, Alice Oseman’s Heartstopper became an instant hit. It has been adored internationally for its...

Maxim Biller and Ukraine: The resignation of a German-Jewish author?

I am well aware that for the sake of switching off from university, or from the cruel news about Ukraine, it is better to...

Ismat Chughtai on Indian female experiences

The Quilt and Other Stories is a 1994 compilation of short stories by Ismat Chughtai (1915-1991), a prolific writer of 20th-century India. She occupied...

In conversation with Elaine Hsieh Chou

Sonya Ribner interviews author Elaine Hsieh Chou.

Review – Stolen Focus: Why You Can’t Pay Attention

a review of the book 'Stolen Focus' by Johann Hari

Rubbish representation in schools, syllabuses and beyond

But it’s not good enough to leave it to often privileged tutors, canon-compilers and Education Secretaries to dictate which texts we study. Time and time again, they have failed to achieve even the remotest degree of representation, a damning outcome in a subject which is so linked to identity and the self. The texts we study at school and beyond should be chosen and shaped by the diverse populations reading them.

The revival of the print book

I think there’s just something special about holding a book in your hands, something unique and timeless that isn’t replicated in a e-book.

Dystopian fiction: comforting or terrifying?

In the cultural moment of the pandemic it may be an attractive idea to compare present society to fictional dystopias. The sense of fear, the limits imposed on people’s rights, the ubiquity of screens, widespread surveillance, the spin tactics of the press, and the hypocrisy of leading political figures are all features of a dystopia.

Reading ‘The Waste Land’ 100 years on

"As the centenary of perhaps the two towering works of literary modernism, T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and James Joyce’s Ulysses, 2022 appears a natural time to reflect on the present day significance of these texts. Such an impulse can only be furthered by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has caused many to use literary works as a means of processing, alleviating, or escaping from present reality."

Reading for pleasure: Finding what you enjoy

"Reading for fun is not the same as reading a book to study it. This may be obvious to some people, but it took a while for me to realise that my love of Jane Austen books didn’t necessarily mean I would enjoy studying one of them."

A tour of foreign literature

The world of foreign fiction is diverse and rich but often underrepresented, which is exactly what we are hoping to change! Our contributors have put forward a collection of some of their favourite books by authors from across the globe. So, enjoy a ‘tour’ through some great recommendations of world literature and maybe you’ll find your next read!

Reading for pleasure: Unrealistic expectations

There used to be three main reasons as to why I would read: firstly, for educational purposes, and as a historian, I can’t avoid this. I didn’t feel like I was even keeping up with the bare minimum of reading for my degree, and I was crossing off hardly any books on those ludicrously long reading lists. How could I allow myself the luxury of reading something for fun? 

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