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Saturday, July 2, 2022

Culture

Copyright or copywrong: the Shape of You case and its implications

We can only hope the decision results in a further backlash against the culture fostered by the Blurred Lines decision and a reduction in the number of frivolous lawsuits against musicians. They are bad for artists, bad for all genres of music, and fundamentally, bad for creativity.

In Harry’s House, there’s room for the romantic

‘Harry’s House’ is a house of several rooms. Of screaming elation, beautiful minutia, and doomed love, all of which make for a complex and emotive listen.

“The world outside our window”: Musings on Marvel

It was recently announced that Penguin Classics would be publishing special editions of certain...

Ten years of the Dark Knight trilogy

It’s been 10 years since the trilogy that shaped my entire life came out.

The Smile’s “slightly crazed and uncertain landscape”

The Smile is not Radiohead; they have a new name, a new line-up, and appear to see themselves to be doing something artistically different

“Unafraid to poke fun at the elite” – Review: The Corn is Green

"Miss Moffat plucks Morgan Evans out of the mines, trains him to speak like a gentleman, and stuffs his head with Adam Smith and Voltaire. It’s like My Fair Lady, but gender-swapped and very, very Welsh."

Vessel: In conversation with Grace Olusola

TW: fatphobia, eating disorders, self-harm. Vessel, the new theatrical anthology from Dawn Productions, examines our relationship with the body and food through episodic fragments....

“Rage and heartbreak” – Review: Medea

"[Medea] is a truly frightening figure as she stalks the quad, coming right up to the audience and looking them in the eye as she delivers some of the most acerbic lines of the play."

Once Long Ago

In Once Long Ago, Jenny Robinson invites us to listen to the “dead tales of old gods long gone” struggling to find their place...

Work is hell: the brutal beauty of corporate aesthetics

Jean-Paul Sartre wrote that hell is other people, but he was wrong: hell is an office job. The stereotypical image summoned by nine-to-five drudgery...

Love Without Words: The Quiet Storytelling of Heartstopper

Rare for the teen drama genre, the show, much like its sketched source material, is taciturn like an actual shy teenager.

‘Irishness existing in England’: the brilliance of Skinty Fia

I first came across Irish post-punk band Fontaines D.C. when my brother brought me their debut album on vinyl for Christmas, back in 2019....

Oxford’s rock and roll: a very short introduction

"Rock and roll and academia has never been the most compatible pairing."

Love Island goes sustainable?

"As a show, Love Island isn’t exactly known for setting a good example for just about anything, so the sudden decision to eschew fast fashion seems rather out of character."

Let’s get physical: Review – Holding

Neily Raymond reviews Holding, Kristy Miles' new play at the Burton Taylor Studio.

Wilde at heart: In Conversation with members of the Lincoln Drama Society

It’s practically a cliché to say that with such short and busy terms, there are more events happening in Oxford than any person could...

Lord Reginald Moreton of Oxfordshire

Poet's Note: "One of my favourite things to do whenever I visit new areas with my friends is to come up with ridiculous "histories"...

In conversation with the creatives behind Top Girls

"Every play Caryl Churchill writes has revolutionised theatre."

Performing the unperformable – Preview: Carrie

Founding Fellas Productions have made an interesting choice in staging Carrie: The Musical at the Oxford Playhouse, which I watched in a dress rehearsal earlier this week. With its catastrophic production history (a book of Broadway failures is named after it), the musical is famously one of the biggest flops in theatre history.

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