As the first batch of finalists finished their exams on Tuesday, University officials renewed efforts to regulate Oxford’s tradition of ‘trashing’.

As the first batch of finalists finished their exams on Tuesday,
University officials renewed efforts to regulate Oxford’s tradition
of ‘trashing’.
When the finalists emerged, they were cheered by many
students lined up with banners, balloons, confetti, and champagne.
One student told a reporter, “Our theme for the trashing
of my friend was Royal Cream Tea. We trashed him with
Cava, scotch eggs, whipped cream, jam and scones.”
Another undergraduate said, “people hide their things on
side streets and drag friends down there to trash them. Last
year my friend was pulled down a side street and tied to a tree
and had things like old milk and liver thrown at her.”
In an email sent out by the Proctors to all students, it was
said that, “safety and public order are our core concerns. We
therefore need your help in keeping people safe, and stamping
out the abuse of all foodstuffs. No flour, no eggs, no beans,
ketchup, let alone rotting food or worse. Rotting food, vomit,
broken glass and other items causing litter are simply not
what any of us wants to see. They are a disgrace and potentially
dangerous. The Proctors will not hesitate to take disciplinary
action against those who break them.” Proctors and security
at the scene were collecting bags full of confiscated trashing
products before students even came out.
However, many described Tuesday’s trashings as tame, believing
that they would get worse as the exam season went on.
Guidance on the Oxford University web site says that anyone
who breaks the trashings code could be fined a minimum of
£80 By the University, the City, or the Police. The Proctors or
their officers can also give students a fine on the spot.

When the finalists emerged, they were cheered by many students lined up with banners, balloons, confetti, and champagne.

One student told a reporter, “Our theme for the trashingof my friend was Royal Cream Tea. We trashed him with Cava, scotch eggs, whipped cream, jam and scones.”

Another undergraduate said, “people hide their things onside streets and drag friends down there to trash them. Last year my friend was pulled down a side street and tied to a tree and had things like old milk and liver thrown at her.”

In an email sent out by the Proctors to all students, it was said that, “safety and public order are our core concerns. We therefore need your help in keeping people safe, and stamping out the abuse of all foodstuffs.

‘No flour, no eggs, no beans, ketchup, let alone rotting food or worse. Rotting food, vomit, broken glass and other items causing litter are simply not what any of us wants to see. They are a disgrace and potentially dangerous. The Proctors will not hesitate to take disciplinary action against those who break them.”

Proctors and security at the scene were collecting bags full of confiscated trashing products before students even came out. However, many described Tuesday’s trashings as tame, believing that they would get worse as the exam season went on.

Guidance on the Oxford University web site says that anyonewho breaks the trashings code could be fined a minimum of £80 By the University, the City, or the Police. The Proctors or their officers can also give students a fine on the spot.



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